Perspective

We are smarter, faster, and better than any virus, but only if we work together. My favorite medieval historian, Yuval Noah Harari, gives us historical context in this Time magazine article. As usual, leadership matters.

“In this moment of crisis, the crucial struggle takes place within humanity itself. If this epidemic results in greater disunity and mistrust among humans, it will be the virus’s greatest victory. When humans squabble – viruses double. In contrast, if the epidemic results in closer global cooperation, it will be a victory not only against the coronavirus, but against all future pathogens.”

Staying Informed

One source of information I am finding very helpful during this time of poor leadership is Dr John Campbell out of the U.K. He is publishing at least one video a day (on YouTube) full of very helpful background, tips and tools, what is going on in other counties. Highly recommended.

The Unforeseeable

Cullen Murphy has written a fascinating article in the February 2020 issue of The Atlantic titled Before Zuckerberg, Gutenberg. It is about how successive waves of innovation were spurred by the introduction of the printing press. Some of the innovation and disruption we experience today are related to these earlier waves, even though digital technology is a new phenomenon.   “… we no longer register the impact of the printing press because we have no easy way to retrieve the ambient sensation of “before,” just as we can’t retrieve, and can barely imagine, what life was like when only scattered licks of flame could pierce the darkness of night.”

It is a short read but packed with interesting details about connections between disruptions. A favorite: “More books and rising literacy created an eyeglass industry, which in turn brought advances in lens-making, which ultimately made possible the telescope and spelled the end of biblical cosmology.”

As human species continues its march to a future we really cannot know, I appreciate the cultural mapmakers like Cullen who think about these matters. 

Bob Lefsetz

Do you get this guy’s emails? He writes (a lot) about the music industry, politics, his observations of life in general. I often agree with his point of view, and I admire his prolific output. This from today’s letter, about the Democratic debates in South Carolina last night:

This election is about hope.

I am utterly astounded that the media and most of those running, never mind the consultants, just don’t get this. They believe this is a game, a known quantity, and he or she with the most experience and expertise wins.

But they are wrong. A tsunami has already wiped out that game, but the people with the most money and the most power are somehow unaware of this.

His site is here; you can sign up for his letter here.

Parkinson’s Nutrition 2020 Research Update

Slices of fresh ripe avocado on a dark wooden table

I just received this report from Sarah King (Invigorate PT & Wellness) and Casey Farlow (Theory Health). It is a terrific summary and evaluation of 16 important and recent Parkinson’s nutrition research studies on a variety of diet and supplementation topics relevant to Parkinson’s patients. It includes a link to the actual hard-copy of each study. Highly recommended to anyone interested in the connection between the food we eat and disease.

Salad, it’s What’s For Breakfast

Greens, olive oil, sea salt, pepper, and red onions

I’ve read several articles since the new year began about reducing sugar in your diet.  In every case, it seems the author danced around the “what to actually eat” question. I’m here to tell you clearly: stop eating cereal. Anything that is manufactured in a plant, and then sold in a box, is not going to taste great unless it has sugar added.

Instead, have eggs, or soup, or my favorite – a big salad with local organic greens, some good quality olive oil, and some nuts and avocado. Fills up your stomach with good fiber, vitamins, and minerals while giving your brain and mitochondria the best fuel they can get.

It’s the first year of a new decade folks. Let’s eat different!

The Aging of America

Well, this article certainly sums it up. Your future is yours to create until suddenly it isn’t anymore. The reader comments on this article were particularly interesting to me..

” … the aging of America demands serious reconsideration of the way we live. Confronting the issue and its many implications, from Medicare’s failure to cover long-term care to the ethics of physician-assisted dying, requires what seems to be the most difficult task for human beings — thinking about the future.”

 

Bad Habits

Watching a woman smoking a cigarette and walking down the street in Montreal, I am struck by the number of idiotic habitual behaviors to which humans wed themselves. You wouldn’t see a dog walking around smoking.