What We Watched May and June 2020

Still socially isolating, still watching 😊 You can see the quality standards slipping a bit as we try to accommodate several generations of viewers.

Fauda (Netflix, 3 seasons)
Linda’s recommendation: Made for tv binge-watching
I loved the actors and their energy, who make this series compulsively watchable. This series portrays the endless violence, testosterone, and horror of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, along with a river of grief, sadness, and cigarette smoke. The background to the series and the “filming of” story are also very interesting (no film for that, just via interviews on YouTube). The voice over for English version cannot compare to the original actors’ voices in Hebrew and Arabic. Highly recommended that you watch in Hebrew setting, with sub-titles.

Richard Jewel
Linda’s recommendation: Enjoyable
Directed by Clint Eastwood, this film is slow but very engaging. Builds to a satisfying conclusion.

Cooked (Amazon Prime)
Linda’s recommendation: Yes
A film about what the real natural disaster was following the Heat event in Chicago in 1996

Knives Out
Linda’s recommendation: watch with your grandmother
Cute who-done-it; nothing special.

Locke
Linda’s recommendation: I didn’t get it
This very slow moving film is shot in a car at night, while a man drives and talks on the phone. I thought it had potential, but it never really developed.

Quiz Show
Linda’s recommendation: Just okay
Given the star power and topic of this film, it didn’t feel very dynamic. Hard to follow storyline, but some fine acting.

Paddington and Paddington II
Linda’s recommendation: Sweet, and reassuring in anxious times. For someone.
The second one has a perfect Rotten Tomatoes score, and a huge recommendation from the Slate Culture Gabfest crew.

Ramy (Hulu, 2 seasons)
Linda’s recommendation: Interesting
I subscribed to Hulu specifically to watch this Bob Lefsetz recommendation, and while I’m glad to have learned some things about the modern Muslim experience in America, I was incredibly distracted by the immaturity, indecision, and generally immoral personality of the main character, Ramy.

What we watched April 2020

I never expected to have this much time to watch stories on-screen, but it’s coronavirus social isolation time in Michigan, and time is mostly available!

Giri/ Haji (Duty/Shame)
Linda’s recommendation: Watch if you like the avant garde
I really enjoyed this series. Set in Tokyo and London, it follows a detective from Tokyo searching for his brother in London, and the assorted cast of characters he meets. I especially liked how the director was unafraid to frame shots, and even film long sequences, differently. The pace was slower which I appreciated in a story like this with lots of characters and tangled storylines. And the casting of Charlie Creed-Miles as Abbott, the impatient, tattooed hoodlum is just genius.

Kingpin
Linda’s recommendation: Not my style
This is the goofiest film I have seen in years, with moments of crass and touches of genius. With this movie, one of my many movie guidelines has fallen and one still stands. “Films with Bill Murray do not appeal to me.” That remains true. “I like any film with Woody Harrelson in it.” Cannot really say this with 100% certainty now. (Also the credits have Woody Harrelson’s name misspelled?!?!)

Three Identical Strangers 
Linda’s recommendation: interesting and worth watching. 
This 90 minute documentary is carefully constructed to not reveal all its secrets right at the beginning. Looks at the question of nature versus nurture in the raising of children.

Unorthodox (Netflix)
Linda’s recommendation: interesting and worth watching
This 4-part series is about a woman breaking free from her orthodox Jewish community, and fleeing from Brooklyn to Berlin. The star, Shira Haas, is mesmerizing- it’s impossible to look away when she is on the screen. (The “Making of” video is also good.)

Bosch (Season 6)
Linda’s recommendation: Always
This series, on Amazon Prime, has been consistently enjoyable. I like the use of older actors in the show, and the collective experience of the ensemble really adds polish to the show. The 10 episodes of Season 6 went by very quickly.

Get Low
Linda’s Recommendation: Yes
Robert Duvall is Felix Bush as well as the executive producer on this film that was satisfying on many levels. This film is not complex, all the questions posed are answered, and it’s not very sexy; it is just one of those small films that are a treasure.

Q1 2020 What We Watched

bank of televisions

This year I thought I would start tracking what we watch, by quarter. I did not realize, in January, how truly different this first quarter of 2020 would be, from all other periods in my life. Perhaps that contributes to what may be the most eclectic collection of videos and film I’ve ever viewed in one three month timeframe (listed in order viewed).

Final Straw: Food Earth Happiness
Linda’s recommendation: See it because it matters
Inspired by the book The One Straw Revolution, this film weaves together stories from some of the world’s foremost figures in the natural farming movement. Together they give modern-day relevance to age-old ideas about food, environmentalism, and happiness. It really is both art and documentary.

Cold Case: Dag Hammarskjold
Linda’s recommendation: See it if you are bored
Weird and complicated, this investigative documentary just gets more so as it progresses.

Dead to Me (Netflix)
Linda’s recommendation: Fun to watch
A twist in every episode in this drama series as you uncover the characters’ secrets.

Salt Acid Fat Heat
Linda’s recommendation: Watch this if you eat or cook
Terrific. Samin Nosrat’s enthusiasm for her craft is catching.

The Rise of Amazon (Frontline)
Linda’s recommendation: Good grief
Great illustration of how executives come to believe their own lies. Hard to watch if you want to keep ordering from Amazon.

All the King’s Men (1949)
Linda’s recommendation: Good but only after you read the book
Based on Robert Penn Warren’s Pulitzer Prize winning novel of the same name, it is impossible to capture the nuance and complexity of the book.

Honeyland
Linda’s recommendation: Must See
Previously reviewed on February 19th on this blog. Terrific, touching, meaningful.  I loved this film.

Little Women (2019)
Linda’s recommendation: I wish I had the time back
Everyone loved this but me. Boring, just like every other version ever made of this story.

The Highwaymen (2019)
Linda’s recommendation: If you like buddy films, this is terrific
About the relationship between two former Texas Rangers as they attempt to apprehend Bonnie and Clyde in the 1930s. Kevin Costner and Woody Harrelson play Frank Hamer and Maney Gault, in a film that deepens as you watch it.

Helvetica
Linda’s recommendation: Watch if you love typeface
A documentary that is an ode to the font type that is Helvetica, mostly by advertising types. It was good but not great. If you want some thing about fonts in general this is not your film.

Tiger King (Netflix)
Linda’s recommendation:   No!
This is Netflix’s contribution to the end of civilization. A peek at a world you didn’t know existed, don’t want to be part of, and hope ends soon – inhabited by some of the most confused and sad characters ever on screen.  Let me also just also note: there are only 4,000 tigers in the wild, while the U.S. has another 5,000 locked in cages, many in “private” zoos.

Ford v Ferrari
Linda’s recommendation: Predictable, but enjoyable
When a movie is based on a true story, I guess that means you cannot say it was formulaic, but that is how this one felt. The sound quality was poor – spoken words were mumbled, the engines were roaring. Finally, I just didn’t feel that the relationship between Carroll Shelby and Ken Davis was flushed out very well in the 2.5 hours it took to tell this tale.

My Experience with YouTube

I really value all I have learned on YouTube over the past few years. I find it to be my “university at home” and am always surprised when people tell me they don’t know anything about it. Beyond the big name entertainment and actual university classes (from institutions like MIT and Yale) I follow probably a dozen subjects on this platform, embodied in the video producers listed below. Check them out if you are interested in any of these topics: 

  1. Food, including what and when to eat, what to avoid, how to shop, how to cook: FlavCity with Bobby Parrish, Serious Eats, NutritionFacts.org, The Dr. Gundry Podcast
  2. Optimizing general health, including sleep, stress, and supplements: Dr. Eric Berg DC, 2 Fit Docs, Bulletproof Radio, Silicon Valley Health Institute (also, the medical professionals I follow are here)
  3. Movement and exercise: Bob & Brad, DailyDosePD, SmartXPD, Mike Chang, Invigorate Physical Therapy 
  4. Stuff to think about: Anand Giridharadas, BookTV, Big Think, Intelligence Squared, Talks at Google
  5. Habits and intention: Matt D’Avella, Break the Twitch, The Daily Stoic, Tim Ferriss 
  6. Funny and interesting to me: WheezyWaiter, the Yarn Therapists, Sunflower Farm Creamery (the goats!), My Self Reliance with Shawn James (off grid living in rural Ontario), Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee
  7. Great interviews: 92nd Street Y, Kevin Nealon (interviews while hiking in the Hollywood Hills), Rich Roll, The Commonwealth Club
  8. News and explaining the crazy: VOX, Democracy Now!, The Common Good with Robert Reich
  9. Music: NPR Music (Tiny Desk Concert), Playing for Change
  10. Local: Groundwork, Here:Say Storytelling, Traverse Area Community Media, Traverse City Film Fetival, Traverse City International Affairs Forum
  11. Home building and interior design: Apartment Therapy, Levi Kelly, House & Home, Kirsten Dirksen, Grand Designs
  12. And Weather, because, you know, I have six apps and three television sources for this topic, but this guy is really good, and my appetite for this information knows no limits! Direct Weather

Books I Read in 2019 and Recommend

I read 37 books this year – 13 were non-fiction, 2 were collections of short stories, and the rest were fiction. I’m pleased with the variety in this group of books.

I rated each book from 1 to 5. Eight earned my solid “3” rating, 11 got a very good rating of “4” and another 11 earned a superlative “5.”

I can recommend the ones I rated “4” as very good and well worth reading. They include (in the order I read them):

      • Seeds of Deception by Jeffrey Smith
      • The Library Book by Susan Orlean
      • 21 Lessons for the 21st Century by Yuval Noah Harari
      • Baby, You’re Going To Be Mine by Kevin Wilson
      • The Circadian Code by Sachin Panda
      • Your Duck is my Duck by Deborah Eisenberg
      • The seven Pete Thorsten mysteries by Robert Wangard
      • Prisoners of Geography: Ten Maps That Explain Everything About the World by Tim Marshall
      • City of Girls by Elizabeth Gilbert
      • The Gift of Rain by Tan Twan Eng
      • The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion

The ones I thought merited a “5” were so amazing, I still cannot believe I got to read them. I hope to revisit them, or other books by these authors, in the coming months.

The Overstory by Richard Powers
A long book – 500 pages – this Man Booker runner up is a giant in every way. The story is unique, the language precise, and the world created as the story unfolds is exquisite. Barbara Kingsolver called it “A gigantic fable of genuine truths.” I’d tell you it’s about trees and people, and taking non-human life seriously.

Virgil Wander by Leif Engler
This author tells a good story about some interesting characters in a small town, and he does so with language so precise and a voice so clear that it made my heart skip. His voice is perfectly that of the upper midwest in the United States. I know these people, and Engler knows their story.

The Endurance, Shackleton’s Legendary Antarctic Adventure by Caroline Alexander
I read a good chunk of this on an iPhone, sitting on an airplane, surrounded by modernity – and this book transported me right back to 1915-1917. I could feel the cold hopelessness of these 28 men struggling to stay alive. An incredible true story I had missed somehow until now.

The Uninhabitable Earth, Life After Warming by David Wallace-Wells
A survey of today’s climate change references – from science, culture, and literature. I found this compelling. “I am like every other American who has spent their life fatally complacent, and willfully deluded, about climate change, which is not just the biggest threat human life on the planet has ever faced but a threat of an entirely different category and scale. That is, the scale of life itself.”

Pachinko by Min Jin Lee
Traces a Korean family dynasty over seven decades of the kind of everyday adventure that makes up all our lives. This book draws you into the family drama and stays with you for a long time afterwards.

Days Without End by Sebastian Barry
“Painful and beautiful” one reviewer says. Barry is one of my favorite authors, and he outdoes himself here. He transports you into the rough tumble of western America in the 1860’s – the west with its Indian wars, the civil war – told in a unique voice. Lots of surprises from his beautiful and complex characters.

The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabelle Wilkerson
Epic. This book is huge in scale, masterfully researched, extremely well written. It was a great read, and it taught me a ton of stuff I never realized about the white privilege I have enjoyed my whole life. Highly recommended.

The Marsh King’s Daughter by Karen Dionne
A thriller on multiple levels, including a finely drawn psychological portrait of a 14 year old girl growing up under extremely unusual circumstances. Set in a remote area of Michigan’s upper peninsula.

Normal People by Sally Rooney
On the Man Booker long list in 2018, Normal People is “is a nuanced and flinty love story about two young people who ‘get’ each other, despite class differences and the interference of their own vigorous personal demons.” Her writing is fabulous, and the story feels modern and true.

The Parade by Dave Eggers
Described as an “allegory” for our times, this short book pulls you forward with a feeling of dread, as the characters Four and Nine are caught up in something bigger than themselves, embodying each of us. Barely a novella, it tells us about ourselves now, a dark joke with a final gut-punch punchline.

Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup by John Carreyrou
Covers the rise and fall of the firm Theranos, the multibillion-dollar biotech startup headed by Elizabeth Holmes, as well as the value of listening to your gut. When something is wrong, there are red flags everywhere. A page turner by a WSJ journalist. Couldn’t put it down.

Teachers Teaching

This is a list of the researchers, medical doctors, and other health professionals who I have been following, and learning from, in 2017. You can search for them on YouTube and find any number of interviews that will clarify their areas of expertise and hypotheses. I consider each of the people on this list to be examples of the next stage of medicine – they look at human health as a system, and have gone far above and beyond the tools and facts presented to them in their original, traditional medical training. If you wish to own your health – physical, mental, emotional, spiritual – I’d encourage you to check out any of these experts.

Mark P. Mattson, Ph.D is Chief of the Laboratory of Neurosciences at the National Institute on Aging Intramural Research Program National Institute on Aging. He is also Professor of Neuroscience at Johns Hopkins University. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZpcVku45hFY

Dale Bredesen, M.D. directs Alzheimer’s Disease Research at UCLA, founded the Buck Institute on Aging, and is the author of The End of Alzheimer’s. https://www.drbredesen.com

David Perlmutter, M.D. is a Board-Certified Neurologist and four-time New York Times bestselling author. His most recent book is Grain Brain, The Surprising Truth About Wheat, Carbs and Sugar. https://www.drperlmutter.com

Valter Longo, M.D. is an Italian-American biogerontologist and cell biologist known for his studies on the role of starvation and nutrient response genes on cellular protection aging and diseases. He is a professor at the USC Davis School of Gerontology and director of the USC Longevity Institute. https://bluezones.com/2016/04/fasting-for-longevity/

Steven R. Gundry, M.D. is an American cardiac surgeon and held the Chief of Cardiothoracic Surgery title while he was a Professor at the Loma Linda University School of Medicine. His most recent book is The Plant Paradox. http://drgundry.com

Zach Bush, M.D. is a triple board-certified physician (Endocrinology and Metabolism, Internal Medicine, and Hospice and Palliative Care) who is first an educator. He seeks to provide a grassroots foundation from which we can launch change in our legislative decisions, ultimately up-shifting consumer behavior to bring about radical change in the mega industries of big farming, big pharma, and western medicine at large. http://www.zachbushmd.com

Joseph Mercola, D.O. runs a web-site that is full of energy and information about functional health. http://www.mercola.com

Thomas N. Seyfried, Ph.D. is a professor at Boston College. He runs a research program focused on mechanisms by which metabolic therapy manages chronic diseases such as epilepsy, neurodegenerative lipid storage diseases, and cancer. The metabolic therapies include caloric restriction, fasting, and ketogenic diets. His most recent book is Cancer as a Metabolic Disease.

Alessio Fasano, M.D. is an Italian medical doctor, pediatric gastroenterologist and researcher at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has made major contributions to the understanding of autoimmune diseases, in particular celiac disease, and is a super-entertaining speaker and educator.

Sachin Patel, D.C. is the founder of the Living Proof Institute and was my introduction to the field of functional medicine. He describes himself as a guardian of truth and a warrior of light, and he has lived up to those words in multiple ways for me. He is the single best public speaker I have ever seen on the topic of true health. https://thelivingproofinstitute.com

Darren Schmidt, D.C. has focused 100% on clinical nutrition since 1998. He owns the Nutritional Healing Center of Ann Arbor and is also a professional speaker on health. His purpose in life is bankrupt drug companies by helping lots of people become healthy.

A Quick Overview: Mitochondria

What are mitochondria?

The powerhouse of your cells. They turn food and oxygen into energy. They are eroded by inflammation and toxins. And they accumulate mutations over time that result in age-related diseases.

How can you strengthen mitochondria?

Four main ways: Improve nutrition, increase exercise, reduce stress, and get a lot of sleep. Plus some nutty-sounding-but-may-be-correct little ways.

Here’s a specific example in the exercise category from a Mayo Clinic study, published in the journal Cell Metabolism:

After 12 weeks on an HIIT cycling plan (three days of cycling – that involved four, 4-minute high-intensity intervals broken up by 3-minute recovery periods – and two days of steady, brisk treadmill walking) researchers measured leg strength, lean muscle mass, oxygen capacity, and insulin sensitivity through biopsied tissue samples from participants thighs.

Those participants who did high-intensity interval training (HIIT) got the biggest benefit at the cellular level. There were other groups in the study doing a variety of exercise programs.  Younger HIIT participants (under age 35) experienced a 49% boost in mitochondrial capacity—the cell’s ability to take in oxygen and produce energy—while older folks (over 65) experienced an even more dramatic 69% increase.

See, that’s what I’m talking about when I talk about mitochondrial function!