It’s Friday, folks. Time to stop.

One of my ideas for making the transition to retirement less sharp, is to have an end of week routine. Fridays have been, and remain, the end of the week for me. During my working life, my partner and I usually stayed home on Friday evenings, hanging out, sharing what we had learned, heard, and seen over the week. It was a time to stop striving and just be. A time to put away the phone, go for a walk together. Ask questions. Breathe in. Breathe out. Let worry go.

The routine isn’t exactly the same now that we are living up north. However, it is in that spirit, that I offer this end of week note with a few of the things things I found interesting this week:

Some thoughts on the future of work for those nearing the end of their careers. Lots of exclamation points. I haven’t seen these kind of opportunities, but if you are in the right situation, you might be able to navigate there from where you are today.

A March 2016 Commonwealth Club interview with Douglas Rushkoff, author of Throwing Rocks at the Google Bus. He is energetic and passionate about the intersection of the human and the marketplace, including topics like the purpose of jobs, the game-ification of the marketplace, and the evolving dynamics between land, capital, and labor. His view is congruent with Yuval Noah Harari’s, another favorite thinker of mine. I highly recommend you spend the hour it takes to listen to this.

In the NYTimes, Jane Brody considers “Who really needs to be gluten free?” and concludes that more of us need to be gluten free than are presently. Of course, I’d go further and say lectin free.

The/Thirty offers a short summery of Dr Steven Gundry’s Plant Paradox here. As I mentioned elsewhere, I have been eating lectin-free for about seven weeks now. I have lost about 12 pounds. More significantly, I have zero cravings, and even when confronted with my formerly favorite foods, I just don’t feel interested enough to eat them again. Really makes me wonder whether my brain or my gut was making food decisions in the past.

FiveThirtyEight offers a five part overview of the state of gut health science here.

How to stimulate your vagus nerve. That is the ‘highway’ between your gut and your brain, and might be the way that a disease that begins in the gut could travel to the brain. Turns out humming is good for you!

For those of you who have had the pleasure of even one meal in or around Lyon, France here’s a summary by Food52 of how the vegetarian/vegan influencing is being manifest there. Yum.

I have been watching a lot of interviews with Dr Sachin Patel recently. I am impressed with his philosophy and the work he is doing at the Living Proof Institute. The Institute has three guiding principles for working with patients: they co-create health (as opposed to treating disease), they agree that most diseases involve what goes into your mouth (and what comes out of your mouth, or what you hold back), and they believe the doctor doesn’t determine the outcome – the patient does. They offer a 30-day program that offers a tip a day to “become proof” that you can architect your own health. Sign up for the 30 days here.

Finally, Diana Krall has a new album. Take a listen. Hum along. And enjoy your weekend!

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